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"And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." - John 8:32
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Author:  Bruce Walker
Bio: Bruce Walker
Date:  March 29, 2007
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Topic category:  Other/General

Quebec Elections

The quiet victories of the good guys continue to go unreported by the mainstream media.

The quiet victories of the good guys continue to go unreported by the mainstream media.  An excellent example is the massive gains this week by Action Democratique in the Quebec provincial elections.  This sounds arcane and trite, but it is anything but that.  Quebec has long been the principal home to Leftism in Canada.  Chrétien and Martin were both Francophone prime ministers of Canada and Leftists who hated America.  Mario Dumont, the leader of Action Democratique, is a conservative.  The huge gains his party made in the Quebec provincial elections means that he is now the practical political leader of the second largest and most Leftist province of Canada, even though the Liberal Party will continue to formally govern as a minority government, is a conservative. 

This means that if Prime Minister Harper, the Conservative Party head of the Canadian government who also leads a minority government, calls a general election – and it looks increasingly like he will – that his party, which currently holds only 10 out of 75 parliamentary seats in Quebec, will almost certainly increase that number significantly (if the provincial election results are an accurate indicator, the Conservative Party will gain at least 15 seats in Quebec alone.) 

Quebec has about one quarter of all the seats in Parliament, and miniscule current number of seats held by Conservatives in Quebec makes it almost impossible for Conservatives to have a majority in Canadian Parliament.  Making big gains in Quebec would put Conservatives within a few seats of having an outright majority in the Canadian Parliament, something that no party in Canada has had for some time. 

Combine that great news with the fact that Harper is himself very popular in Canada and when his party ran in the in the general election fourteen months year ago, when Harper was a relative unknown and his performance as Prime Minister could not be judged, and it is easy to see the Conservative Party  increasing the small number of seats that it has now in the four Atlantic Coast provinces, as well as picking up ten seats in Ontario (where his party is running a dead heat with the Liberal Party) and gaining seats British Columbia, and Manitoba brings Harper and his Conservative Party to the magic number of 155 seats – a pure majority.

This is very likely to be the case.  The Conservative Party lead over the Liberal Party has been growing.  In the latest poll, Conservatives had an eight point lead (in January of last year, the Liberal Party was running two points ahead.)  The two parties have been switching leads, until very recently, when the Conservatives began to open an ever bigger lead. 

Conservatives, to be sure, are still a minority in Canada (as in every democracy, except America), but because of the “first past the post” system of election in Canada, America and Britain (the candidate with a plurality of the votes wins the seat), a party with a substantial lead has an excellent chance of winning a majority of seats in the Parliament.

What would this mean to America?  What would it mean to conservatives?  Consider that virtually every poll indicates that Sarkozy, the pro-American, will be elected the next president of France in the May 2007 runoff election.  Consider that Tony Blair may (I think maybe will) call a general election, as is his right, when he leaves as Prime Minister and that every poll shows the Conservative Party in Britain winning a comfortable majority in Parliament.  Consider that the election for next government of Italy, which could come very soon, looks likely to be a conservative victory. 

Consider all of those things together, and then consider that our closest neighbor, Canada, may very soon have a markedly stronger conservative government which is markedly more pro-American in its public positions and is markedly tougher with Moslem terrorists (who, recall, plotted the murder of Harper a while back.)

What all this may mean is that, led by the resolute will of America, the rest of the democracies are starting to get some backbone.  Opposition to that gaggle of monsters – radical Moslems, atheist Marxists like Kim Jong Il and Fidel Castro, Latin American America-haters like Hugo Chavez, cynical Leftists in democracies like Chrétien and Schroeder – a gaggle of monsters with huge religious and national differences, but a common commitment to evil, a gaggle which I call simply “Sinisterists” in my book, Sinisterism: Secular Religion of the Lie (for reasons that you will find in that book), are losing the hearts and minds of ordinary people.  Shhhhhhh!  The good guys are winning.  

Bruce Walker

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Biography - Bruce Walker

Bruce Walker has been a published author in print and in electronic media since 1990. He is a regular contributor to WebCommentary, Conservative Truth, American Daily, Enter Stage Right, Intellectual Conservative, NewsByUs and MenŐs News Daily. His first book, Sinisterism: Secular Religion of the Lie by Outskirts Press was published in January 2006.


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Copyright © 2007 by Bruce Walker
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